Meanwhile, Letting Our Pet Rabbit Outside Some More


A Flemish Giant rabbit buried past his eyeballs in periwinkle, which he's eating.
“Would you like a napkin, perhaps?”
“What for?”
“… Palate cleanser?”
“I’ll take four.”

Much of the backyard is given over to what we had been calling myrtle, but is actually periwinkle. Gardening and animal-care web sites are all but universal in declaring that it is a bitter-tasting plant. (Hi, Ben!) My love nibbled on a bit, as if it were a perfectly normal and ordinary thing for a person to eat plants from their own yard, and agreed with the bitter assessment. It is commonly listed as an inexpensive and natural way to keep one’s garden deer- and rabbit-proof, as the animals find the taste so repulsive they’ll leave it — and your garden surrounded by it — alone. Here, our pet rabbit shoves his head into a huge pile of the stuff and does. not. stop. eating.

Advertisements

Author: Joseph Nebus

I was born 198 years to the day after Johnny Appleseed. The differences between us do not end there.

2 thoughts on “Meanwhile, Letting Our Pet Rabbit Outside Some More”

    1. Certainly he isn’t an average rabbit. For one he’s larger than I was through fourth grade. But it’s still odd he’s got so into the myrtle. He’s not shy about suspecting us of poisoning him if we try anything a bit outside his normal diet, including chard, pumpkin, and a dog food kibble we had left over from sheltering a mouse.

      I wonder if he isn’t being deliberately contrary after all.

      Like

Please Write Something Funnier Than I Thought To

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s