60s Popeye: Time Marches Backwards, or Prehistoric Popeye done early


Now let’s journey back in time to 1960. Time Marches Backwards is another Jack Kinney-produced time-travel cartoon, with story by old reliable Ed Nofziger and direction by Hugh Fraser. I am once again annoyed, slightly, that there’s no production order information for these cartoons. Mostly that doesn’t matter, as there’s no important continuity. Here’s the … Continue reading “60s Popeye: Time Marches Backwards, or Prehistoric Popeye done early”

60s Popeye: Popeye’s Tea Party, with a lot of casual tea-sing


We travel back in time with Jack Kinney studios to 1960 today. Popeye’s Tea Party has a story credited to Jim Rivind, and direction by Hugh Fraser. Jim Rivind is a new name around here. Hugh Fraser is all over the place. The title’s almost a warning that there’s depictions of “Indians” and these are … Continue reading “60s Popeye: Popeye’s Tea Party, with a lot of casual tea-sing”

60s Popeye: Popeye’s Used Car, and the return of Milt Schaffer jokes


Popeye’s Used Car is another 1960, Jack Kinney-produced cartoon. The story’s credited to Milt Schaffer, of that fascinating Popeye-versus-Woody-Woodpecker showdown. The direction is credited to Hugh Fraser who’s got a lot of credits already here. After several peculiar cartoons it’s almost a comfort to have a slightly boring one to write about. Boring’s not a … Continue reading “60s Popeye: Popeye’s Used Car, and the return of Milt Schaffer jokes”

60s Popeye: Popeyed Columbus, which could have gone much worse


One step back into 1961, one step back into 1960. Jack Kinney is the producer again. The cartoon’s got a story by Raymond Jacobs and direction by Hugh Fraser. So here is Popeyed Columbus. Well, that’s not a premise that’s aged badly or anything. It’s another cartoon framed by O G Wotasnozzle, the daffy inventor … Continue reading “60s Popeye: Popeyed Columbus, which could have gone much worse”

60s Popeye: Old Salt Tale (the New Salt Tale’s bogged down in construction)


It’s back to Jack Kinney studios for this week’s King Features Popeye cartoon. The story is by Ed Nofziger, who’s done a bunch of fairy tale adaptations before. Animation direction is credited to Hugh Fraser. Here’s 1960’s Old Salt Tale. We start out with Olive Oyl prancing in the ocean, and Popeye and Swee’Pea enjoying … Continue reading “60s Popeye: Old Salt Tale (the New Salt Tale’s bogged down in construction)”

60s Popeye, Invisible Popeye: the heck am I watching?


Settle in, kids. We got a weird one. I know, I can hear you getting excited. The weird cartoons are fun even if my review just becomes live-tweeting. It’s another cartoon from the Jack Kinney studios. Hugh Fraser gets credit for the story and for the animation direction. Here, featuring Professor O G Wotasnozzle, is … Continue reading “60s Popeye, Invisible Popeye: the heck am I watching?”

Popeye and the Giant: body horror, weirdness, but no, not *that* Giant


I complained that last week’s 60s Popeye was a competent cartoon. Every piece of it made sense, followed from the premise, and came out pretty bland. These are not faults for this week. It’s another Jack Kinney joint, this one with story by Noel Tucker and animation direction by Hugh Fraser. Noel Tucker is a … Continue reading “Popeye and the Giant: body horror, weirdness, but no, not *that* Giant”

Popeye the Popular Mechanic builds a 60s Robot


I got to wondering whether every major cartoon character in the 60s built a homemade robot. Then I thought out who I could remember doing this: Popeye. Wile E Coyote, in one of the Rudy Larriva cartoons. That’s about it, although I’d bet money that, like, Mister Jinks tried one on Pixie and Dixie. It … Continue reading “Popeye the Popular Mechanic builds a 60s Robot”

60s Popeye goes to … Haweye? … Popeye Haweye. All right. We’ll try this.


I don’t know how many animation teams Jack Kinney had working for these many 60s Popeye cartoons. It’s clearly enough that I should be paying attention to directors, though. The cartoon for this week has Hugh Fraser listed as the animation director, and story by Raymond Jacobs. Both the animation and the story feel quite … Continue reading “60s Popeye goes to … Haweye? … Popeye Haweye. All right. We’ll try this.”