Statistics Saturday: ‘E’ Content, by letter


Letter ‘E’ Content
A 0
B 1.375
C 0
D 0
E 1
F 0.75
G 0
H 0
I 0.25 [1]
J 0
K 0
L 0
M 0 - \imath [1]
N 0 - \frac12\imath [2]
O 0
P 0
π 0
Q 0
R 0
S 0
T 0
U 0 + \frac12\imath [3]
V 0
W 0 + \imath [3]
X 0
Y 0
Z 0

[1] Value is dependent on the typeface used.

[2] Value is dependent on the typeface used and only applies to the lowercase ‘n’.

[3] Value is extremely dependent on the typeface used.

Reference: Troy: A Collar City History, Don Rittner.

Statistics Saturday: 14 Most Popular Words You Can Make With Rotationally Symmetric Letters


Because there’s not really enough of these letters! We should grab some from a language that isn’t using all theirs!

  1. HI
  2. SOX
  3. HIS
  4. OX
  5. HO
  6. XIS
  7. SIX
  8. OH
  9. OHS
  10. XI
  11. HOS
  12. SO
  13. IS
  14. I

Source: A History of the Kennedy Space Center, Kenneth Lipartito and Orville R Butler.

Statistics Saturday: Twelve Sentences Of 2015


All certified sentences that have appeared here within the last twelve months! Enjoy, if that’s your sort of thing.

  1. Despite that there’s a single “best day”, Wednesday, with 53 posts on Wednesdays, which is about as well-organized as you could hope for from the Gregorian calendar what with its familiar and well-explained flaws.
  2. Yes, there was one time Captain Kirk let the planet of the week keep their omnipotent computer-god overlord too, but that was the time McCoy had contracted a fatal case of We Need Him To Go Off And Get Temporarily Married syndrome, so Kirk’s mind was on other stuff.
  3. Ambassador Spock, may I at last present you with the face I have brought you halfway across the galaxy to punch.
  4. It all ends, as any great early-30s cartoon will, with a resolution that makes you go, “wait, what?”
  5. I never realized sputtering was the sort of thing needing engineering
  6. I’d like to track how many insights that is you’ve offered, but the count of them keeps coming out wrong.
  7. This means something, but I don’t know what.
  8. That turbolift is for the limited-edition figures only
  9. This was a series about how buff troll dolls use magic alien crystals to become a competent rock band and, um, samurai wrestlers or something
  10. S J Perelman had an experience with a dental trade journal once, and shared his thoughts.
  11. We were running about one-third “weird electronic music experiments from that time I bought an album of BBC Radiophonic sound products” to two-thirds “random chapters from Michael Lewis’s The Big Short and Robert Louis Stevenson’s Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde”.
  12. Yes, I get the dramatic irony in it being about repeating New Year’s resolutions.

You know, I talk about Star Trek here a lot considering this is mostly a blog about how Apartment 3-G didn’t make any sense anymore.

Statistics Saturday: My Readership, July 1st through 10th, In Alphabetical Order


  1. 41 (July 10)
  2. 30 (July 3)
  3. 39 (July 9)
  4. 37 (July 1)
  5. 37 (July 6)
  6. 28 (July 4)
  7. 25 (July 7)
  8. 21 (July 5)
  9. 27 (July 2)
  10. 23 (July 8)

This means something, but I don’t know what.

Statistics Saturday: Percentage of the Alphabet Taken Up By Each Letter


Letter Percentage
A 3.704%
B 3.704%
C 3.704%
D 3.704%
E 3.704%
F 3.704%
G 3.704%
H 3.704%
I 3.704%
J 3.704%
K 3.704%
L 3.704%
M 3.704%
N 3.704%
O 3.704%
P 3.704%
Q 3.704%
R 3.704%
S 3.704%
T 3.704%
U 11.104%
V 3.704%
W (See `U’)
X 3.704%
Y 3.704%
Z 3.704%

Statistics Saturday: The Whole Numbers One Hundred Through One Hundred Twenty Written In Alphabetical Orders


[ Please be warned, LFFL! More whole-number ordering is ahead, as I said would come in time! ]

Investigation into this problem revealed that while most people would call the number 100 “one hundred”, there are ambiguities about whether, say, “106” should be “one hundred six”, “a hundred and six”, or “one-oh-six”, and whether it should be “a hundred and thirteen” or “a hundred thirteen” or the like, and therefore different alphabetizations are sensible. Therefore selected alphabetizations are provided for your convenience.

Alphabetical Order (The First)

  1. 100
  2. 108
  3. 118
  4. 111
  5. 115
  6. 105
  7. 104
  8. 114
  9. 109
  10. 119
  11. 101
  12. 107
  13. 117
  14. 106
  15. 116
  16. 110
  17. 113
  18. 103
  19. 112
  20. 120
  21. 102

Alphabetical Order (The Second)

  1. 100
  2. 108
  3. 111
  4. 105
  5. 104
  6. 109
  7. 101
  8. 107
  9. 106
  10. 110
  11. 103
  12. 112
  13. 102
  14. 118
  15. 115
  16. 114
  17. 119
  18. 117
  19. 116
  20. 113
  21. 120

Alphabetical Order (The Third)

  1. 118
  2. 111
  3. 115
  4. 114
  5. 100
  6. 119
  7. 108
  8. 105
  9. 104
  10. 109
  11. 101
  12. 107
  13. 106
  14. 103
  15. 102
  16. 117
  17. 116
  18. 110
  19. 113
  20. 112
  21. 120
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