Statistics August: People Wanted To Know About The Guy Who Drew Pluggers Last Month


With the month started out I’d like to look at last month. I’d especially like to see that lots of people read and appreciated my writing the past month. But I’ll settle for a day where the post is easy to write.

According to WordPress there were 4,281 pages viewed here in August. That’s the fifth-highest month on record, which is nice. Most of those records have been in the past year; only November 2015, with 4,528 views, is an old high. And that is above the twelve-month running average of 3,969.6 views per month.

There were 2,454 unique visitors, which I think is the fourth-highest I have on record. It’s above the twelve-month running average of 2,311.2 unique visitors, though.

Bar chart of monthly readership. The last several months have seen around four thousand page views and two thousand to 2500 unique visitors each month.
Still not buying this claim about turning a blog into a source of income. I don’t know what they’re selling but I know it’s not legit.

There were 104 things liked in August, above the running average of 96.3 and the biggest month for likes since January. There were also 38 comments, again beating the running average of 23.3. That’s almost as many as in May, so while this is nowhere near the heights of January 2018, it’s at least getting chattier.


What posts were popular last month? A lot of people wanting to know about comic strip artists changing. Also that months-of-the-year-in-reverse-alphabetical-order thing. But the most popular posts from August last month? These:


78 countries sent me any readers at all in August, down from July’s 82 no significant amount. There’d been 77 of them in May and June. 18 of these were single-reader countries, down from July’s 28 but in line with May and June’s 20.

Mercator-style map of the world with the United States in darkest pink, most of the Americas, Europe, Russia, and the Pacific Rim in light pink, and scattered African countries, plus India, also in pink.
Would I get a Greenland reader if I mention I finally saw that episode of Conan O’Brien where he went to Greenland and met all 24 inhabitants? … No, it would not.
Country Readers
United States 3,080
United Kingdom 218
India 198
Canada 142
Australia 69
France 51
Brazil 39
Philippines 38
Spain 27
Finland 23
South Africa 23
Germany 21
Hong Kong SAR China 21
Italy 20
Norway 19
Sweden 18
Trinidad & Tobago 18
Indonesia 16
Malaysia 16
European Union 13
Vietnam 11
Belgium 10
Ireland 10
Poland 10
Mexico 9
Netherlands 9
Slovakia 9
Guadeloupe 8
Taiwan 8
Thailand 8
New Zealand 6
Russia 6
Singapore 6
Switzerland 6
Chile 5
Peru 5
Serbia 5
Egypt 4
Japan 4
Kenya 4
Nigeria 4
Romania 4
South Korea 4
El Salvador 3
United Arab Emirates 3
Argentina 2
Brunei 2
China 2
Colombia 2
Czech Republic 2
Denmark 2
Ecuador 2
Honduras 2
Hungary 2
Lebanon 2
Tunisia 2
Turkey 2
Uganda 2
Ukraine 2
Uzbekistan 2
Zambia 2
American Samoa 1 (*)
Austria 1
Bhutan 1
Caribbean Netherlands 1
Dominican Republic 1
Ethiopia 1
Greece 1
Guatemala 1
Iraq 1
Jordan 1 (*)
Liechtenstein 1
Lithuania 1
Paraguay 1
Portugal 1
Puerto Rico 1 (*)
Slovenia 1
St. Lucia 1
Uruguay 1

American Samoa, Jordan, and Puerto Rico were single-view countries last month too. Lebanon bowed out of single-reader status after six months.


Which story comics do I plan to cover the next several weeks? Subject to breaking news, of course?

Whatever I do cover, and any news about any of the story comics, I’ll have in a post at this link.

And my overall plan remains to have a long-form essay Thursday Evening, Eastern Time. Some kind of Statistics Saturday post Saturday evenings, my dad’s favorite feature. Sundays, Popeye cartoons from the 60s. And then What’s Going On In the story comics on Tuesdays. The rest of the week I stare at my scraps file, trying to figure out whether “palindromedome” could ever be a thing. It’s not looking promising.


From the dawn of time to the dawn of September I’ve posed 2,769 things here. They drew a total 183,846 views from 103,497 unique visitors. WordPress figures I posted 15,621 words in August, an average of 503.9 words per posting. My average post, year to date, had 536 words.

If all this has convinced you to read my blog regularly, please click the “Follow Another Blog, Meanwhile” button on this page. Or if you’d rather read without being tracked, add the RSS feed for this page to your reader. If you don’t think you have a reader, get a free Dreamwidth or Livejournal account. You can add any RSS feed to your friends page from https://www.dreamwidth.org/feeds/ or https://www.livejournal.com/syn as you like. And I do have my semi-accessible @nebusj Twitter account set to announce posts, although I don’t get to read it most of the time. Contact me here if you need me to read what you say. I’m sorry it’s like that but I just don’t want to deal with fixing Twitter’s issues. You understand.

Statistics 2010s: Ten Things Of The Decade Just Passed


  • August 22. everyone who had a part in this day, give yourselves a fresh round of applause without being unseemly about it.
  • Cheddar II: Cheddiest. From out of Nowhere, Connecticut, 06269, this new flavor, appearing in ouch-y sharp, dangerous in its pointedness, somewhat polyhedral, and mint, has taken over the world of cheese and opened up new avenues in being so much more than the inspirational cheddar that it’s not hard to see why old-fashioned cheddar is expected within the next two years to go the way of the original, almost forgotten ched.
  • once-in-shakespeare.com Where else but this scrappy new start-up can one get a convenient listing of all the words that appear in the canonical plays of William Shakespeare one time? Anyone can produce a list of all the words, just by shaking a collected edition on its side until the pieces fall out, but who’s going to take out the duplicates and grow new authors with them?
  • Raised Flooring. After years of drop-down ceilings being the cliche and overused answer to ways to make a room seem more claustrophobic we have this alternative. Unexpected bonuses include having more things to count while bored, and the improved sense of balance as people try to walk on those bar things from which the floor panels are hung. This will inspire grace in our walking like Groucho Marx if nothing else will.
  • How the English language has no solitary word for the feeling of uncertainty that accompanies thinking that one’s socks are damp when there’s no chance for taking one’s shoes off to check or to change them no matter how much we need a word for exactly this sensation. This single loss has saved millions of dollars and dozens of lines of newspaper type in just the past month. And think of all the people it’s inspired to try to buy less painful shoes. Yes, yes, you can put together a bunch of words to get the same sense across. It’s not the same.
  • Flatware. There is nothing which soothes the desperate need to buy flatware quite like flatware, and we should all be glad the flatware industry exists to satisfy this need. Be warned: much so-called flatware these days is not in fact flat, but extends into a third or even a fourth spatial dimension. If you have no choice but to purchase this imitation flatware do speak to the steamroller operator with whom you’re on good terms — you are on good terms with at least one steamroller operator, aren’t you? — to arrange for the appropriate enflattening.
  • March 10. Nobody’s saying it’s a patch on August 22, but it’s still really good all around and everybody deserves to take a bow for that too.
  • Adverbs. These sentence-stuffers had a great run and it’s a shame that we’re scheduled to lose them if the conversion to Modifiers.6 ever happens. Still, anyone who’s ever had to write to a specified word count has relied on their ability to be added to or removed from sentences and they will be missed, like when someone notices the `a’ or `an’ doesn’t match with the next word anymore.
  • Sriracha Automobiles. For the past fifteen years sriracha has been slipping almost unnoticed into everything, starting with sandwiches, then cooking shows, then books, then consumer electronics, and now into the important industries of Navy ships and personal automobiles. No one may know where sriracha comes from or what it intends, but we can be sure that it’s here and it’s unavoidable, and that with the proper setup it can be used for good or at least to not be so frightening, and that earns it a place on this list.
  • Simple Thermometers. Despite fears no important features of the weather developed into the imaginary and then the complex number plane. So despite the shortages in Complex Thermometers none were needed, except for that stretch in fall where the temperature became one of the principal roots of a heptic polynomial. But for the most part we got along just fine with the old-fashioned thermometers and isn’t that one of the ten things about the decade just finished?

Statistics August: People Like It When I Have A Dead YouTube Link here


I was able to examine my readership earlier this month than I did last time around. Thank the month starting conveniently on the weekend and while I didn’t have anything else major going on. I’ve kept up my spreadsheets, too, so now I have lots of numbers with decimal points and all that to think about. Also I learn something unsettling about my most popular posts. Let’s look things over.

In August there were 3,692 recorded page views. This came from 2,201 unique visitors as far as WordPress will tell me. Both of these are increases for the last several months. More, they’re both above the twelve-month running average. The running average for page views had been 3,158.8 views from 1,804.4 unique visitors. This implies a growing popularity, which is gratifying and reassuring and all kinds of happy.

Slightly over four years' worth of monthly readership figures as seen in a bar chart. The last several months see the number of monthly views rising.
So it looks like I have eight months before the glory days of the final collapse of Apartment 3-G fade completely from memory. I mean the memory of everyone except me.

There were 127 things liked around here over month of August. The twelve-month running average was for 163.9 things to be liked each month. This implies that while more people are looking at more things, they’re not so crazy about any of it. It was another dire month for comments, also: nine posted over the month of August, below the twelve-month running average of 40.8. Well. All right, then.

I can break this down into more decimal points too. There were 31 posts published in August. It’s not the case that only stuff posted in August was viewed in August. But I can calculate the statistics-per-posting, which seems relevant since how often I post is the thing I’m most in control of. I mean apart from writing anything actually interesting.

August saw 119.1 views per posting; the twelve-month running average was 103.7. There were 65.2 visitors per posting; the running average was 59.3. There were 4.1 likes per posting; the twelve-month running average was 5.4, which makes it sound like the likability shortfall wasn’t that bad, really. There were 0.3 comments per posting, compared to a twelve-month average of 1.3, which makes it sound like I barely need a comments section at all. Hm.


The unsettling thing is in what the most-visited pages were. There were 473 pages, besides the home page, to get any views in August 2019. 186 pages got only a single view. The five most popular were dominated by What’s Going On In reports, as ever:

The most popular wholly-original-to-me content was that microfiction With The Rise Of Digital-Life Persons, which I’m quite happy about. It was a different kind of writing and I had fun doing that. My most popular long-form essay was Why I Figure You Should Write Your Own Web Browser, which is amazing because it got all its likes in the two days between its publication and the end of the month.

The unsettling thing is the second-most-popular piece of the month. That was a 2014 review of an ancient Paul Terry cartoon. It’s one of historic value, since it’s a full-sound cartoon that predates Disney’s Steamboat Willie. But it has a dead YouTube link for the cartoon itself. I can believe some weird event causing a bunch of people to look up an obscure cartoon from a forgotten animation studio and hitting my site. But one that doesn’t even have the video? I suspect some kind of shenanigan.


74 countries or things like countries sent me at least one reader in August. 14 sent me just the single reader. There’d been 70 countries sending me any reader in July and 69 in June. There’d been 20 single-view countries in July and 18 in June. Here’s the full roster:

Mercator-style map of the world, with the United States in the darkest red. Most of the Americas and Eurasia are in a fairly uniform pink, as are Australia and New Zealand. India's a slightly darker pink. There are only a couple African countries to have sent any readers my way.
Well, you know me: as popular in Nigeria as I am in Argentina and Jamaica. Or as in Moldova and Honduras combined.
Country Readers
United States 2,631
India 235
Canada 111
United Kingdom 72
Australia 67
Sweden 67
Brazil 59
Philippines 45
Kenya 42
South Africa 25
Italy 23
Belgium 19
Finland 17
Germany 17
Denmark 16
Mexico 16
Norway 14
Japan 13
El Salvador 12
Romania 12
Spain 12
Puerto Rico 11
France 9
European Union 8
Indonesia 7
Thailand 7
Ireland 6
Turkey 6
Colombia 5
Greece 5
Malaysia 5
Argentina 4
Jamaica 4
Nigeria 4
Russia 4
Singapore 4
Slovakia 4
South Korea 4
Israel 3
Nepal 3
Netherlands 3
New Zealand 3
Pakistan 3
Poland 3
Portugal 3
Saudi Arabia 3
Serbia 3
Switzerland 3
United Arab Emirates 3
Vietnam 3
China 2
Guam 2
Honduras 2
Hong Kong SAR China 2
Latvia 2
Lithuania 2
Moldova 2
Taiwan 2
Ukraine 2
Uruguay 2
Antigua & Barbuda 1
Bangladesh 1
Bermuda 1
Bolivia 1
Brunei 1 (*)
Croatia 1 (*)
Curaçao 1
Czech Republic 1 (*)
Georgia 1
Iraq 1
Oman 1
Papua New Guinea 1
Peru 1 (*)
Sri Lanka 1

Brunei, Croatia, Czech Republic, and Peru were single-view countries in July also. No country’s been a single-view place for more than two months in a row just now.


What do I plan to post over the coming month? A long-form essay, Thursday evenings, Eastern Time. Then, also Statistics Saturday posts for as long as I think of silly things to categorize. And all my What’s Going On In posts, published Sunday nights Eastern Time. In particular my schedule is, barring breaking news or important surprises:


From the start of 2019 through the start of September I’d published 241 posts in all. These had a total of 140,753 words so far this year. This was 15,654 words in total in August. That is 505.0 words in the average post for August. That’s comfortably down from July’s average of 610.3, and even the year-to-date average of 582 words per post. I can sometimes be brief.

Through the start of September were 314 total comments this year, for 1.3 comments per posting. This average has held for three months now. There had been 1,221 total likes for the year, an average of 5.0 likes per posting. The average had been 5.2 at the start of August and 5.3 at the start of July.


If you’d like to read these posts regularly, you can add the https://nebushumor.wordpress.com/feed/ RSS feed to whatever reader you use. If you don’t have a reader, you can get a free Livejournal or Dreamdwidth account and put it in your Friends page there. You can also keep track of this blog in WordPress, by using the “Follow Another Blog, Meanwhile” button on the upper right corner of this page.

I am on Twitter as @Nebusj, although I haven’t been there lately. Twitter’s server has refused all connections from my web browser (Safari) and I’ve been just this close to doing anything about that. The automated tweet-about-new-WordPress-postings hasn’t broken yet, at least, but who knows how long that will last?

Watch this space for developments, future or past. Thank you.

Statistics August: What People Liked Here Before Alley Oop Had News


So I always try to start the month with a review of what’s popular and how popular it is. I find this out by checking WordPress’s page statistics. I can guess that September 2018 will have some relatively big numbers for me as people try to figure out the Alley Oop situation. But the news of that broke the 1st of September and so can’t do anything for me for August. I suppose I could do a review of what will be popular in September, but I haven’t written most of it. And most of it will be the story strip recaps. Which, if breaking news doesn’t force me to alter schedules should be this:

Please plan how much you’re interested in the story strips accordingly.

So here’s the readership chart for the months leading up to August 2018, plus a little bit of September so far:

August 2018: 2,848 views; 1,619 visitors; 1.76 views per visitor; 31 posts published.
I used to track the views-per-visitor but I never knew what to do with the information. I guess it’s nice that on average people look at more than one thing around here, at least.

My slow secular decline continues! For another month the number of page views has dropped, to 2,848 from July’s 2,984. And down from June’s 3,454. I’m not sure but it looks like I’m drifting down something like 125 page views per month ever since that January 2018 high. The number of unique visitors bounced up, though, to 1,619. July had only 1,569. That doesn’t get back to June’s 1,791 but it’s a bit of a rally. We’ll see whether July or August is the fluke and which one is the trend.

Those measures of reader engagement … eh. Technically the number of likes rose, to 180, from July’s 165. But there were between 172 and 177 likes from April through to June this year. It’s as good as fixed in place. The number of comments rose to 39 from July’s 36, but again, June saw 56 and May 54. There’s just not a lot going on here.

What were the popular posts around here in August? About what you’d expect given that nobody was expecting Alley Oop to need explaining:

My most popular long-form essay in August was Everything There Is To Say About Making Art, which I think is my favorite of the essays I posted in August. If you’d like to see the long-form stuff I did write — and I started out the blog figuring those were the important things, with everything else teasers to keep me in readers’ thoughts — here’s the roster:

Now to the roster of countries that sent me any kind of readers. There were 60 countries sending me any readers at all, down from July’s 66 and June’s 71, so again, the word seems to be shrinking. 16 of these were single-reader countries, down from July’s 17. See gain, shrinking countries.

Country Readers
United States 2,193
India 119
Canada 112
Australia 89
United Kingdom 60
Germany 22
Brazil 19
Italy 19
Philippines 18
Singapore 15
Hong Kong SAR China 10
South Africa 10
France 9
Russia 9
Netherlands 8
Mexico 7
Spain 7
Denmark 6
Sweden 6
Taiwan 6
Czech Republic 5
Finland 5
Greece 5
Japan 5
Malaysia 5
Romania 5
Saudi Arabia 5
Costa Rica 4
European Union 4
Indonesia 4
Trinidad & Tobago 4
Hungary 3
Norway 3
Peru 3
Poland 3
United Arab Emirates 3
Argentina 2
Austria 2
Bulgaria 2
Estonia 2
Ireland 2
Kenya 2
Portugal 2
Switzerland 2
Brunei 1
Colombia 1
Ghana 1
Israel 1
Jordan 1
Malta 1
Morocco 1
Myanmar (Burma) 1
New Zealand 1
Pakistan 1 (*)
Serbia 1
South Korea 1
Sri Lanka 1
Turkey 1
Ukraine 1
Venezuela 1 (*)

Of all the world, only Pakistan and Venezuela have been single-reader countries two months in a row. Yes, I’d love to know what they read and why not any more, but that would take looking or something.

I started September with 243 posts on the year to date, and a total of 558 comments. this averages to 2.3 comments per posting. There were 1,499 total likes, for an average of 6.2 likes per posting. This is the same comments and likes-per-post average as at the start of August. Well, here’s something different: at the start of August I’d published 158,984 words here so far this year. That’s 20,725 words over the month. For the year, through the end of August, I’ve averaged 654 words per post, up very slightly from the 652.2 at the start of August. I start the month having had 96,879 total page views from 53,279 unique readers. Yes, I should do something for the 100,000th page view, but I’ll never know when I reached it. I bet.

If you’d like to read Another Blog, Meanwhile at your convenience here’s the RSS feed for every post, which is pretty convenient. If you’d rather put it in your WordPress Reader, use the button that says something about adding the blog to your reader. It should be at the upper right corner of the page. If you’d like to see me announcing the posts as they happen you can find me as @nebusj on Twitter. Thanks for following however you like.

Statistics Saturday: Eight August Holidays


  • 6th. Orthodox Christmas in July.
  • 9th. Subtweet a future Disgraced Former President Day.
  • 11th. Manasquan, New Jersey, Big Sea Day, or as it is known in giant communities, “Little Sea Day”.
  • 14th. 545th birthday of Margaret Pole, Countess of Salisbury. Surprise party; don’t tell her. No shouting or fireworks at the reveal please.
  • 18th. Alumni Magazine Reunion Day.
  • 21st. Belated Remembering Of My Brother’s Birthday And Calling The One Whose Birthday Was In July By Accident Day.
  • 27th. Orboween. (Observed)
  • 28th. Orboween. (Actual)

Reference: The Making Of Kubrick’s 2001, Jerome Agel.

Statistics Friday: How August 2017 Liked Me


Well, I dropped below 2,000 page views for August 2017. It was a good run of two months above 2,000 page views, but I knew it couldn’t last, not with the end of my amusingly un-engaging Another Blog, Meanwhile Index project. After 2,118 page views in June and 2,132 in July, WordPress says it recorded 1,965 page views for August. The number of unique readers dropped also. It was 1,501 in June, and 1,349 in July, but a mere 1,301 in August. At this rate, oh, I don’t know. I suppose I’ll sputter to no more viewers than my father, checking in to see why he keeps getting e-mails from something called “Another Blog, Meanwhile” now and then.

The number of likes drifted down after July’s bump. There were 122 likes here in June, 154 in July, and then 137 in August. I’m kind of hoping that I’ve reached some kind of minimum; the figure hasn’t changed much in the past year, although I can still see in the distant past when it would be triple that. Comments popped back up again, although they’re still anemic. 19 comments got posted in June, 11 in July, and 19 again in August. There’d be more but I ran out of time to answer a couple this past week. That figures.

My most popular pieces continue to be What’s Going On In updates on the story strips. Really I could shut down everything else and just do the story strip updates. My most-liked piece that wasn’t comic strip reporting or commentary was The Chuckletrousers Decades, rediscovered by some of the refugees from alt.fan.dave_barry who’ve gone over to Facebook, where I happen not to be. My most popular long-form humor piece — the thing that, originally, I thought would be the center of this blog — was Thanking You For Listening, last week’s explanation for why I don’t have a pop-culture hangout podcast.

So what was tops in popularity here? About what you’d expect:

Plainly, I have to post more (public domain) S J Perelman pieces. But they’re all so long and kind of stuffy in that S J Perelman way.

On to the list of countries. I make out readers from 68 separate countries, which compares to July’s 69 by being a slightly different number. It’s also slightly different from June’s 67.

Country Readers
United States 1375
Canada 80
India 79
United Kingdom 45
Brazil 41
Australia 40
Germany 39
Philippines 23
France 14
Russia 14
Romania 12
South Africa 12
Argentina 11
Vietnam 11
Italy 10
Sweden 10
Ukraine 9
New Zealand 8
Hungary 6
Netherlands 6
Spain 6
Bangladesh 5
Japan 5
Mexico 5
Switzerland 5
Hong Kong SAR China 4
Indonesia 4
Pakistan 4
Poland 4
Singapore 4
Austria 3
Ecuador 3
Finland 3
Ghana 3
Laos 3
Lithuania 3
Maldives 3
Norway 3
Barbados 2
Denmark 2
Georgia 2
Greece 2
Iceland 2
Ireland 2
Israel 2
Jordan 2
Latvia 2
Venezuela 2
Albania 1 (*)
Armenia 1
Belgium 1
Bulgaria 1
Cambodia 1 (***)
Cape Verde 1
Colombia 1
Czech Republic 1
El Salvador 1
Kuwait 1
Madagascar 1 (*)
Malta 1
Moldova 1 (*)
Nigeria 1
Paraguay 1
Qatar 1
Serbia 1 (*)
Slovakia 1
Thailand 1
United Arab Emirates 1

There were 20 single-reader countries, whereas in July there were 17. In June there were 26, pointing out that there’s something like six countries just gone missing over the summer. Weird. Cambodia has been a single-reader country four months running now. Albania, Madagascar, Moldova, and Serbia have been single-reader countries just two months in a row.

Monday broke Sunday’s streak for the most popular readership day around here. It took 16 percent of page views, like is always the case all the time. The midnight hour was the most popular one for reading with 12 percent of page views coming the hour I have stuff scheduled to post. Last month that hour also got 12 percent of page views. This section is starting to sound like some kind of fix is in.

August starts with 60,912 page views from a suspiciously even 34,000 unique visitors. Ah, thanks, visitor 34,000, and please claim your prize from the concierge station. I also start August with 764 followers on WordPress, ten more than had me on their Reader pages at the start of July. I’m sure they’re all reading on their Reader page, where I can’t detect them.

If you’d like to join this band of readers, please do. There’s a button to Follow ‘Another Blog, Meanwhile’ in the upper right of this page. If you prefer, you can get it delivered by e-mail. The e-mail might be more convenient if you don’t routinely check WordPress accounts to read things, and it means you’ll get to see my posts before I notice the glaringly obvious typos that have to be fixed two minutes after posting. Try it out, won’t you? It’s fun.

Those on Twitter know me as @Nebusj. Those on Skype know me as a hoax, because I haven’t got an account there. Thank you, won’t you?

From The August 2017 Scraps File


More text that I couldn’t do anything with. If you can, congratulations!

Another problem is my speaking voice I sound like I’m being sarcastic. It’s an endemic problem with my family. Something in our upbringing caused us to transmute all our deepest Jersey vowels and verbal tics into, instead, conveying an eye-roll with the way we say words like “Hello” and “which”. I don’t think it was just my siblings and I trying to preemptively put one another down. We love each other, so far as we tell each other. But I can’t even say, “I spilled some tea and wanted to wipe it up” without sounding like I’m the one being hostile. I didn’t spill the tea on purpose. Anyway, a heavy dose of sarcasm is fine for some conversations, but not if you’re trying to make a real argument that, like, William Shatner showed a deft touch in some of the scenes he directed in Star Trek V: The One William Shatner Directed. See? You already think that’s me being sarcastic. — Cut from last week’s discussion about my lack of podcasting because it’s one of those paragraphs I thought up while in bed and figured oh, I’m definitely putting that in when I get up in the morning, and it was two days after I posted it.

ham sanitizer — Look, sometimes when you want to write a high-volume humor thingy you just go into these free-association free-form things and jot down whatever comes to mind and then you look at it afterwards and have to shrug because it doesn’t always pan out.

“The Tasmanian rainforest is considered a Gondwanan relic.” — Yes, that old Wikipedia statement once again, because I just can not make myself believe there’s nothing in there. But August was another month where whatever is there didn’t turn up for me. Maybe September.

hand satirizer — Again from the free-association free-form thingy and the thing to remember is that just because an idea pops into your head doesn’t mean you owe it the slightest gratitude for doing so. If it’s a good idea it’ll do some heavy lifting on its own and show why it’s a good idea and you don’t have to try building up every pair of words until it’s something.

Oh, yeah, I know how these things come about. You’re minding your own business and then you see this bolt of light and stop the car to examine. It’s this desperate, crashed alien who rallies himself from death long enough to transfer onto you a weird tattoo that tingles with a body-encompassing energy. The alien turns out to be this mutant human who half a millennium ago was a minor Dutch nobleman before being struck by a comet that granted him astounding superpowers he struggled to keep secret in his new not-quite-immortal life. Then you go on to discover that your own son, born with the powers of your now mutating body, will travel back in time hundreds of years to create a comet bearing the superpower tattoo, that proceeds to hit his own later self, given amnesia and planted in the Netherlands to be hit by the energy-bringing comet that sets this whole time loop into motion. I must know like twenty guys that’s happened to. — Cut because the person who was talking about this said no, he thought the character just inherited magical abilities from his father, and I pointed out that technically speaking that’s true in my scenario too, and the person shook his head sadly and walked away. This led us into a good argument about whether this would have been creating a paradox, or resolving a paradox, or avoiding a paradox altogether, and long story short we’re not speaking anymore and that person is justified.

yam sani– — No. Just, you know? No.

If you or someone you love is able to make use of these scraps please submit a comment care of the Bishopric of Utrecht, 1024 – 1528. Please be advised that responses might be delayed, as, according to a quick skim of Wikipedia’s articles abou the history of the Netherlands, it seems like there was a lot of investituring and annulling was going on back then and that probably has everyone quite distracted.

Statistics Saturday: The Days On Which United States Vice-Presidents Have Died Most Often


Rank Date Vice-Presidents Dead On That Day
1 July 4 John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Hannibal Hamlin
2 January 13 Schuyler Colfax, Hubert Humphrey
2 (tied) June 4 William A Wheeler, Charles W Fairbanks
2 (tied) November 18 Chester A Arthur, Henry A Wallace
2 (tied) December 26 Harry Truman, Gerald Ford
6 January 5 Calvin Coolidge
6 (tied) January 6 Theodore Roosevelt
6 (tied) January 18 John Tyler
6 (tied) January 22 Lyndon B Johnson
6 (tied) January 26 Nelson A Rockefeller
6 (tied) February 8 Charles Curtis
6 (tied) March 8 Millard Fillmore
6 (tied) March 31 John C Calhoun
6 (tied) April 18 William R King
6 (tied) April 20 George Clinton
6 (tied) April 22 Richard Nixon
6 (tied) April 23 Charles G Dawes
6 (tied) April 30 Alben W Barkley
6 (tied) May 16 Levi P Morton
6 (tied) May 17 John C Breckinridge
6 (tied) June 1 Thomas R Marshall
6 (tied) June 11 Daniel D Tompkins
6 (tied) June 14 Adlai E Stevenson
6 (tied) July 24 Martin Van Buren
6 (tied) July 31 Andrew Johnson
6 (tied) September 14 Aaron Burr
6 (tied) September 17 Spiro Agnew
6 (tied) October 30 James S Sherman
6 (tied) November 7 John Nance Garner
6 (tied) November 19 Richard Mentor Johnson
6 (tied) November 21 Garret Hobart
6 (tied) November 22 Henry Wilson
6 (tied) November 23 Elbridge Gerry
6 (tied) November 25 Thomas A Hendricks
6 (tied) December 31 George M Dallas
36 All Other Days

If we learn anything from this, it is: don’t be a Vice-President in November. It doesn’t work out well for you. But August is surprisingly safe.