Dug It


I got to looking up the early-80s video game Dig Dug, which taught me how to better my enemies by wielding a bicycle pump at them, which has never worked for me. I’ve never got past the third board in the game, and a bicycle pump has done even worse at fending off my enemies in real life. But StrategyWiki delighted me by not just being able to tell me the names all the things in it, and revealing that among the “bonus vegetables” that pop up if you do far better than I have ever done are eggplants, pineapples, garlic, Galaxian, and green peppers, is that Dig Dug himself has a proper name and it isn’t “Mr Dug”.

Apparently his proper name is Taizo Hori, and he’s the father of “Mr Driller”, famed star of the Mr Driller series of video games that I never heard of before this. I don’t know why Mr Driller changed his family name. Maybe Taizo’s wife kept her maiden name, or they didn’t marry at all. Maybe Mr Driller wanted to get away from having a name that’s a Japanese pun, which it turns out his dad’s name is. “Horitai zo” apparently means “I want to dig”, although I’m not sure changing your name from “I Want To Dig” to “Mr Digger” isn’t just a lateral move, like going from “Mr Shepherd” to “Mr Fellow With A Keen Interest In Organizing Groups Of Sheep”. Obviously there are parts of the psychology of the Dig Dug universe that I don’t adequately understand.

It also turns out there’s backstory to Dig Dug that explains Taizo is digging around his own vegetable patch, which is why vegetables turn up, and it’s being invaded by those critters which is why he’s trying to blow them up, and now I kind of want to look up an explanation for how the Burger Time universe came to be, but I’m also afraid of finding out. I’ve almost gotten to the third board in that.

Also, garlic is a vegetable? I guess I can accept it as a vegetable. I suppose I didn’t have a clear notion of what it was, besides one of those things that comes chopped up in a bottle and that I put too much of on my burger. All right, so it’s a vegetable, then.

Statistics Saturday: How Many Things It Takes To Make A Hundred Of Things


Thing How Many It Takes To Have A “Hundred” Of That Thing
Bowstaves, oars, and staves for hogsheads, as well as other certain types of pieces of wood 120
Canvas and linen cloth 120
Cod, Ling (which turns out to be cod), and Haberdine (which is also cod) 124
Dried fish that’s somehow not just cod? 160
Drinking glasses 100, mercifully
Eggs 120
Fish, not excluding herring 120
Onions, Garlic 225
Pins, Nails 120
Sheep or lambs, in Roxburghshire and Selkirkshire 106

Reference: http://www.sizes.com/units/hundred.htm, from the Index to Units and Systems of Units page, which is just absorbing every minute of my time anymore because there’s things like a “stathmos” that’s equal to “about five parasangs”, which clears up things if you’re in Ancient Greece and taking units from the Persians when they aren’t looking.