Caption This: With Spock On Romulus


Spock busy looking way too dignified to be in this episode, and staring at a Romulan who's just got the most unfortunate grin on his face.
Ambassador Spock, Romulan Senator Pardek, and somebody wearing a shower curtain standing around the Who Would Buy This aisle at Bed, Bath, and Beyond.

Romulan Guy In The Middle: “Ambassador Spock, may I at last present you with the face I have brought you halfway across the galaxy to punch.”

Spock: “I regard punching this face as a solemn duty and a service to the galaxy.”


Yeah, it’s a quick little thing, but in my defense, I’m tired after writing about another bunch of comic strips that mention mathematical themes, in which I explain how they’re doing things that are perfectly funny if you understand them well enough. Also, hey, I reached 15,000 page views over the past day, which is a nice fairly round number. Hi, gang.

Meanwhile, In Space …


Scott and Spock inside the Jeffries tube; Kirk somewhere far below.
I’m not actually sure which episode of Star Trek this is from, which would have brought intense shame to the 16-year-old me.

“What do you mean Engineering is voting to secede from the Enterprise?!”

“Furthermore, Captain, Mister Scott has requested that I inform you that he is no longer speaking to you.”

“Is this about stealing lines again? Because I keep explaining, I’m only thinking of the best interests of the show, that’s why!”

Misconstrued Poetry Restorations


The North American Council on Poetic Quality has issued the following guidelines of words that can no longer be used in consumer- or industrial-grade poetry. Exemptions will be applied for cause. The Council also reminds all that National Haiku Pedantry Month starts the first of November, so be ready to help them enforce the rules about cutting words and nature imagery by leaping up on desks and shaking golf clubs about while insisting it’s everyone else on the Internet that has the issue and they should go write limericks instead.

O: as a particulate extrapolation that fills in those little bits where it feels the sentence hasn’t quite got started yet, the word-letter “O” has suffered from extreme overuse and fatigue, bringing the population of the word-letters to the brink of extinction. Therefore the word-letter “E” is to take its place, as the stocks of this are much more robust and have a tendency to get into the garage if not thinned out some. Use with abandon, the long E only.

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